The great thing about pedalling through Cape Town’s streets on an AWOL City Cycle tour is that you get to chat the locals from a bicycle seat. Recently on a tour with Lisa and Peter from Germany we cycled into  the colourful quarters of the Cape Malays known as the ‘ Bo-Kaap’ where we came across vendors in a ‘bakkie’  (small truck) blowing a trumpet in true Kaapse style to announce sales of snoek.

The great thing about pedalling through Cape Town’s streets on an AWOL City Cycle tour is that you get to chat the locals from a bicycle seat. Recently on a tour with Lisa and Peter from Germany we cycled into  the colourful quarters of the Cape Malays known as the ‘ Bo-Kaap’ where we came across vendors in a ‘bakkie’  (small truck) blowing a trumpet in true Kaapse style to announce sales of snoek.

The great thing about pedalling through Cape Town’s streets on an AWOL City Cycle tour is that you get to chat the locals from a bicycle seat. Recently on a tour with Lisa and Peter from Germany we cycled into  the colourful quarters of the Cape Malays known as the ‘ Bo-Kaap’ where we came across vendors in a ‘bakkie’  (small truck) blowing a trumpet in true Kaapse style to announce sales of snoek.

It’s Cape Town’s most iconic seafood and caught out on the cold Altantic ocean in the colourful fishing boats you see along the West Coast and in False Bay. The fast growing predatory fish is highly unpredictable and moves in large schools sometimes resulting in ‘snoek runs’.  This is when the local fisherman hawk fish from every street corner and every housewife comes out for a bargain.  A large snoek up to 6kg can be sold anywhere between R50-R100 depending on your bargaining skills.

Snoek Fishing

Many rumours and myths circulate about ‘pap’ snoek ( literal translation in Afrikaans means ‘porridge fish’). Its still safe to eat but the texture is rather floury. No one knows for sure what cause of snoek going ‘pap’, but its a huge insult to ask the vendoring fisherman whether his snoek is pap or not. Even when you buy fish fresh off the boats its can still be ‘pap’. Some suggest that you shouldn’t eat snoek in the month ending in ‘Y”

The local Cape Malay ladies in the Bo-kaap  make ‘gesmoorde‘ snoek, pickled or salted snoek. My favourite is braaied snoek with just butter and lemon juice, but a Cape favourite is with sweet potatoes and apricot jam. Left-overs make a great snoek pate! (recipe below).

So next time you in Cape Town, pedal the streets of Cape Town’s Bo-kaap with AWOL Tours and then do a Cape Malay Cooking experience in a local ladies home to learn about the tastes of Cape Town.

AWOL City cycle tour in Bo-Kaap

SMOKED SNOEK PATE

Ingredients:

  • 250g smoked snoek, boned & flaked
  • 250g cream cheese
  • 1Tbs lemon juice
  • pinch of ground ginger or garlic
  • 5 spring onions, finely chopped
  • 125ml whipping cream or mayonaise
  • Optional – you can also add a splash of Tabasco, mustard or a teaspoon of horseradish paste

Method:
Combine all ingredients except cream in a food processor.  Whip cream separately and fold into the mixture.  Scoop into a mould and refrigerate.  Serve with wholewheat toast.

Read more on how to check if your snoek is pap or not!

It’s Cape Town’s most iconic seafood and caught out on the cold Altantic ocean in the colourful fishing boats you see along the West Coast and in False Bay. The fast growing predatory fish is highly unpredictable and moves in large schools sometimes resulting in ‘snoek runs’.  This is when the local fisherman hawk fish from every street corner and every housewife comes out for a bargain.  A large snoek up to 6kg can be sold anywhere between R50-R100 depending on your bargaining skills.

Snoek Fishing

Many rumours and myths circulate about ‘pap’ snoek ( literal translation in Afrikaans means ‘porridge fish’). Its still safe to eat but the texture is rather floury. No one knows for sure what cause of snoek going ‘pap’, but its a huge insult to ask the vendoring fisherman whether his snoek is pap or not. Even when you buy fish fresh off the boats its can still be ‘pap’. Some suggest that you shouldn’t eat snoek in the month ending in ‘Y”

The local Cape Malay ladies in the Bo-kaap  make ‘gesmoorde‘ snoek, pickled or salted snoek. My favourite is braaied snoek with just butter and lemon juice, but a Cape favourite is with sweet potatoes and apricot jam. Left-overs make a great snoek pate! (recipe below).

So next time you in Cape Town, pedal the streets of Cape Town’s Bo-kaap with AWOL Tours and then do a Cape Malay Cooking experience in a local ladies home to learn about the tastes of Cape Town.

AWOL City cycle tour in Bo-Kaap

SMOKED SNOEK PATE

Ingredients:

  • 250g smoked snoek, boned & flaked
  • 250g cream cheese
  • 1Tbs lemon juice
  • pinch of ground ginger or garlic
  • 5 spring onions, finely chopped
  • 125ml whipping cream or mayonaise
  • Optional – you can also add a splash of Tabasco, mustard or a teaspoon of horseradish paste

Method:
Combine all ingredients except cream in a food processor.  Whip cream separately and fold into the mixture.  Scoop into a mould and refrigerate.  Serve with wholewheat toast.

Read more on how to check if your snoek is pap or not!

It’s Cape Town’s most iconic seafood and caught out on the cold Altantic ocean in the colourful fishing boats you see along the West Coast and in False Bay. The fast growing predatory fish is highly unpredictable and moves in large schools sometimes resulting in ‘snoek runs’.  This is when the local fisherman hawk fish from every street corner and every housewife comes out for a bargain.  A large snoek up to 6kg can be sold anywhere between R50-R100 depending on your bargaining skills.

Snoek Fishing

Many rumours and myths circulate about ‘pap’ snoek ( literal translation in Afrikaans means ‘porridge fish’). Its still safe to eat but the texture is rather floury. No one knows for sure what cause of snoek going ‘pap’, but its a huge insult to ask the vendoring fisherman whether his snoek is pap or not. Even when you buy fish fresh off the boats its can still be ‘pap’. Some suggest that you shouldn’t eat snoek in the month ending in ‘Y”

The local Cape Malay ladies in the Bo-kaap  make ‘gesmoorde‘ snoek, pickled or salted snoek. My favourite is braaied snoek with just butter and lemon juice, but a Cape favourite is with sweet potatoes and apricot jam. Left-overs make a great snoek pate! (recipe below).

So next time you in Cape Town, pedal the streets of Cape Town’s Bo-kaap with AWOL Tours and then do a Cape Malay Cooking experience in a local ladies home to learn about the tastes of Cape Town.

AWOL City cycle tour in Bo-Kaap

SMOKED SNOEK PATE

Ingredients:

  • 250g smoked snoek, boned & flaked
  • 250g cream cheese
  • 1Tbs lemon juice
  • pinch of ground ginger or garlic
  • 5 spring onions, finely chopped
  • 125ml whipping cream or mayonaise
  • Optional – you can also add a splash of Tabasco, mustard or a teaspoon of horseradish paste

Method:
Combine all ingredients except cream in a food processor.  Whip cream separately and fold into the mixture.  Scoop into a mould and refrigerate.  Serve with wholewheat toast.

Read more on how to check if your snoek is pap or not!