On our AWOL city cycling tour we bike through the oldest residential areas in the Cape Town City Bowl – Bo Kaap(Above the Cape). The area was originally created for its ‘huurhuisies’ (rental houses) for Dutch soldiers residing in the Cape. After slavery was abolished in 1834 –the British, in the meantime had colonized the Cape – Bo Kaap opened up for cheap rental houses for freed slaves.

On our AWOL city cycling tour we bike through the oldest residential areas in the Cape Town City Bowl – Bo Kaap(Above the Cape). The area was originally created for its ‘huurhuisies’ (rental houses) for Dutch soldiers residing in the Cape. After slavery was abolished in 1834 –the British, in the meantime had colonized the Cape – Bo Kaap opened up for cheap rental houses for freed slaves.

On our AWOL city cycling tour we bike through the oldest residential areas in the Cape Town City Bowl – Bo Kaap(Above the Cape). The area was originally created for its ‘huurhuisies’ (rental houses) for Dutch soldiers residing in the Cape. After slavery was abolished in 1834 –the British, in the meantime had colonized the Cape – Bo Kaap opened up for cheap rental houses for freed slaves.

The Mother City has always been a melting pot with inhabitants from the West and East blending at the far end of Africa. The residents of Bo-Kaap are mostly descendants from slaves who were imported to the Cape by the Dutch colonist during the 16th and 17th century. They came from mostly, Indonesia, Java, Malaysia, and other places in Asia, and also Africa. With them, they brought the religion of Islam. Still seen and heard, are the mosques and prayers at the proper hours.

The traditions from the original habitants of Bo Kaap have deeply engraved influences on South African culture. The Cape Malay Cuisine uses distinct spices used to spice the old Dutch recipes. The Afrikaaps dialect (kitchen slang) has had major influence on the Afrikaans language. Also, each year on the 2nd of January the Bo Kaap celebrates a big street party, called the Kaapse Klopse (or “Cape Minstrels”) in the centre of town. It was introduced by the Muslim slaves who celebrated their only day off in the whole year.

AWOL gives the visitor a unique insight into the history of the Bo Kaap on the City Cycling Tour. Experience the smells, the old Cape architecture, and colourful houses representing one of the most vibrant and unique areas in Cape Town.

Written by Jeremy Schreiner

The Mother City has always been a melting pot with inhabitants from the West and East blending at the far end of Africa. The residents of Bo-Kaap are mostly descendants from slaves who were imported to the Cape by the Dutch colonist during the 16th and 17th century. They came from mostly, Indonesia, Java, Malaysia, and other places in Asia, and also Africa. With them, they brought the religion of Islam. Still seen and heard, are the mosques and prayers at the proper hours.

The traditions from the original habitants of Bo Kaap have deeply engraved influences on South African culture. The Cape Malay Cuisine uses distinct spices used to spice the old Dutch recipes. The Afrikaaps dialect (kitchen slang) has had major influence on the Afrikaans language. Also, each year on the 2nd of January the Bo Kaap celebrates a big street party, called the Kaapse Klopse (or “Cape Minstrels”) in the centre of town. It was introduced by the Muslim slaves who celebrated their only day off in the whole year.

AWOL gives the visitor a unique insight into the history of the Bo Kaap on the City Cycling Tour. Experience the smells, the old Cape architecture, and colourful houses representing one of the most vibrant and unique areas in Cape Town.

Written by Jeremy Schreiner

The Mother City has always been a melting pot with inhabitants from the West and East blending at the far end of Africa. The residents of Bo-Kaap are mostly descendants from slaves who were imported to the Cape by the Dutch colonist during the 16th and 17th century. They came from mostly, Indonesia, Java, Malaysia, and other places in Asia, and also Africa. With them, they brought the religion of Islam. Still seen and heard, are the mosques and prayers at the proper hours.

The traditions from the original habitants of Bo Kaap have deeply engraved influences on South African culture. The Cape Malay Cuisine uses distinct spices used to spice the old Dutch recipes. The Afrikaaps dialect (kitchen slang) has had major influence on the Afrikaans language. Also, each year on the 2nd of January the Bo Kaap celebrates a big street party, called the Kaapse Klopse (or “Cape Minstrels”) in the centre of town. It was introduced by the Muslim slaves who celebrated their only day off in the whole year.

AWOL gives the visitor a unique insight into the history of the Bo Kaap on the City Cycling Tour. Experience the smells, the old Cape architecture, and colourful houses representing one of the most vibrant and unique areas in Cape Town.

Written by Jeremy Schreiner